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We're on N. Diamond Bar Blvd just north of the 57 and 60 interchange.

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We have implemented new Safe Practices to adhere to the CDC and American Optometric Association recommendations. We look forward to serving you and keeping you and our staff healthy and safe. Please familiarize yourself with the following before your next appointment:

1. Please text or call us from your car when you arrive for your appointment and wait for further instructions.
2. Face masks will be required while at our office and we will NOT be providing them
3. Temperatures will be taken before entering the office
4. Everyone will be required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entering
5. All patients will be asked about their health status
6. We ask that patients come to their appointment unaccompanied, so there will be fewer people in the office
7. Patients who need caregivers or minors may be accompanied by one person
8. Social distancing around the office will be observed as much as practically possible
9. Pens will be used once and then disinfected
10. Doctor schedules have been lightened to decrease patient flow throughout the office
11. Increased cleaning of patient areas will be prioritized
12. Car-side or curb-side pickup will be available for contacts or glasses, as well as shipping at no-charge to patients
13. To control the flow of patients in our glasses and sunglasses dispensary, frame selections/adjustments will be done by appointment only. Our staff is also great at doing glasses selection via email!
14. Tele health appointments are available for eye infections or other eye problems, without having to come into the office.
15. If you are new to our office, please fill out our patient forms on our website prior to coming in.

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dr chen diamond bar

Got a Shiner!

 

What Exactly Is a Black Eye?

A black eye, also known as a periorbital hematoma, is usually not an injury of the actual eye (which is why it is called “periorbital”- around the eye). It typically occurs when there is an injury to the face or the eye socket which causes bleeding beneath the skin and bruising. The term, “black eye” comes from the dark coloring of the bruising that occurs underneath the skin around the eye.

When a blunt force hits the eye socket, this can cause capillaries in the area to burst, causing hemorrhaging, also known as a hematoma. This blood can accumulate in the eye socket and as it begins to be reabsorbed into the surrounding tissues, the colors of the bruising begin to change. That’s why you will often notice the coloring of the black eye to go from a dark purplish-red color to brownish and then yellow.

Sometimes along with the external bruising, you might also notice a small amount of bleeding on the white surface of the eye, which is called a subconjunctival hemorrhage. This is when the tiny blood vessels on the white sclera are broken and leak blood. It’s generally harmless but sometimes looks scarier to the patient than the black eye does. This condition will also reabsorb on its own and is nothing to be concerned about.

While most black eyes can look pretty serious due to the dramatic color, an uncomplicated black eye will typically heal within a week to ten days. If it doesn’t, there could be a more serious issue such as a bone fracture or an orbital blowout fracture.This could present with restricted eye movement, especially if looking up or down, and numbness of the cheek and/or upper lip on the same side as the black eye. The eye may even appear sunken in. Further, if there is bleeding within the actual eye (called a hyphema) or floaters or flashes in the vision, then it is definitely advisable to call Dr. Bladh’s office and get in as soon as possible. These could be signs of more serious damage such a corneal or retinal damage and can lead to vision loss. We take these symptoms very seriously and even have an after hours number for you to call if you’re experiencing such symptoms.

Treatment for a Black Eye

Usually, the best treatment for a black eye is to apply a cold compress (or even better, a bag of frozen vegetables, which is more flexible and can conform to the contours of the face) directly on the area. The cold will reduce swelling and constrict capillaries to reduce internal bleeding as well. Apply the cold for about 15-20 minutes every hour. If there is pain, over the counter pain medications can help.

If however, you experience any of the following symptoms, you should seek medical attention:

  • Blood on the surface of the eye or a visible incision on the eye
  • Vision changes such as double vision, blurred vision, loss of vision or the appearance of floaters
  • Loss of consciousness, dizziness or fainting
  • Loss of eye movement
  • Persistent headaches
  • Blood or fluids coming from the ears or nose
  • Vomiting
  • Signs of infection such as excessive swelling, pus, redness or a fever
  • Severe pain

In addition to blunt trauma, black eyes can be caused by sinus infections, nasal or eye surgery or other infections in the area such as the teeth infections or cellulitis (a serious infection that can occur around the eyes). A skull fracture can also cause both eyes to turn black, sometimes known as raccoon eyes.

Unless you notice any severe symptoms you can rest assured that your black eye is a bruise just like anywhere else on the body and with a little care, rest and patience, it will clear up in no time.

NATIONAL SUNGLASSES DAY 6/27

We understand the patient-doctor relationship, wherein us as doctors are more concerned about the health of the eyes and the majority of our patients are more concerned about looking good in what they wear. So we have been able to offer the best of both worlds and combine these different ways of thinking with what we do. This is one of the main reasons we are putting such a big emphasis on making sure each of our patients knows about June 27th, NATIONAL SUNGLASSES DAY (I really wish we could have you read it with a booming echo instead of thinking we’re just yelling via this blog post in all caps)! On a more serious note, we are offering 25% off for anyone who comes into the office and purchases sunglasses on 6/27.

All of our frames have UV protection and are ensured to protect you from the sun while still making you look good! With brands like Ray-Ban, Tom Ford, Tiffany & Co and Oakley to name a few, you’re sure to find something that you love. We run a promotion every year giving a discount on Ray-Ban frames only and we have to stock up the week before because of the demand we get for them. Imagine how much more a bigger discount on all brands will have! So make sure to come early and see our selection before it runs too low.

Exposure to ultraviolet rays emitted from the sun has been linked to several types of skin cancer, but for us and the AOA, we’re most concerned about the eyes. Did you know there’s actually a type of sunburn that your eyes can have? A few of the problems that can occur because of over exposure from UV rays are photokerititis, pterygium, cataracts and even macular degeneration to name a few. They are very serious and can lead to more severe problems as you age. Luckily we can prevent a lot of those by making sure we have the best type of protection for our vision. I was thinking about going into detail with each disease I just named but thought I would have lost you if I haven’t already. So here is my last ditch effort to get you into the office. Let us style you with the latest sunglasses trends. Give us a call at 909.861.3737 or stop on by the office June 27th to help us support the NATIONAL SUNGLASSES DAY. See you there!