Skip to main content

We're on N. Diamond Bar Blvd just north of the 57 and 60 interchange.

Schedule An Appointment Call Us Now 909-402-2020

x

We have implemented new Safe Practices to adhere to the CDC and American Optometric Association recommendations. We look forward to serving you and keeping you and our staff healthy and safe. Please familiarize yourself with the following before your next appointment:

1. Please text or call us from your car when you arrive for your appointment and wait for further instructions.
2. Face masks will be required while at our office and we will NOT be providing them
3. Temperatures will be taken before entering the office
4. Everyone will be required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entering
5. All patients will be asked about their health status
6. We ask that patients come to their appointment unaccompanied, so there will be fewer people in the office
7. Patients who need caregivers or minors may be accompanied by one person
8. Social distancing around the office will be observed as much as practically possible
9. Pens will be used once and then disinfected
10. Doctor schedules have been lightened to decrease patient flow throughout the office
11. Increased cleaning of patient areas will be prioritized
12. Car-side or curb-side pickup will be available for contacts or glasses, as well as shipping at no-charge to patients
13. To control the flow of patients in our glasses and sunglasses dispensary, frame selections/adjustments will be done by appointment only. Our staff is also great at doing glasses selection via email!
14. Tele health appointments are available for eye infections or other eye problems, without having to come into the office.
15. If you are new to our office, please fill out our patient forms on our website prior to coming in.

Home »

diamond bar eye doctor

Why You Shouldn’t Visit the ER for Eye Emergencies During COVID-19

On April 22, the American Optometric Association (AOA) urged patients with emergency eye care needs to get in touch with their local optometrist prior to seeking treatment in hospital emergency rooms. Doing so not only eases the burden on emergency departments but also helps prevent the spread of COVID-19.

What Is Considered an Eye Emergency?

Most eye-related conditions can be treated in an outpatient optometry office or clinic. Emergency eye care includes, but is not limited to, urgent clinical advice or intervention for eye injuries and conditions that entail a foreign object in the eye, chemical burns, a sudden change in vision, flashes and floaters (which might suggest a retinal detachment), contact lens discomfort, red eyes and any other problems or symptoms that may impact or interfere with daily activities.

Prioritizing Your Eye Care Needs During COVID-19

During the coronavirus outbreak, we have been going above and beyond to ensure that people are receiving the emergency eye care they need.

Patients should first contact our office for guidance and potential treatment prior to heading to an overwhelmed hospital emergency room. Dr. Bladh can assess the level of care the patient needs—whether it’s telehealth or urgent care that requires a visit to the eye clinic or, in severe cases, even the emergency room.

This will ensure that patients get prompt treatment while allowing hospitals to conserve their resources for the current pandemic. In fact, research has shown that treating eye emergencies at eye doctors’ offices can potentially divert 1.4 million patients away from emergency rooms per year.

While we have closed our store for routine appointments, Dr. Bladh in Diamond Bar continues to provide emergency care for those who need it. We’d like to reassure our patients that we are here to help with anyone’s emergency eye care requirements – for both for new and existing patients.

References:

https://www.visionmonday.com/eyecare/coronavirus-briefing/crisis-response-tactics/article/aoa-cautions-patients-against-avoidable-er-visits-for-primary-eyecare-services-during-covid19-pandemic/

8 Ways to Protect Your Eyes at the Office

Everyone seems to be staring at a screen these days, whether their computer, their smartphone or another digital device. The stress it puts on your eyes can cause a condition called “digital eye strain” (DES) or “computer vision syndrome” (CVS). Symptoms include eye fatigue, dry eyes, blurred vision, headaches, neck and shoulder pain, red eyes, and eye twitching.

How To Protect Your Eyes While You Work

Below are a few things you can do to lower your risk or mitigate any discomfort associated with DES.

1. See your eye doctor for a comprehensive eye exam

This is one of the most important things you can do to prevent or treat symptoms associated with computer vision syndrome. During your eye doctor’s appointment, make sure to speak with Dr. Theresa Taylor about your working habits, including the frequency and length of time you use a computer and other devices at work and at home.

If you get a chance before you come, measure the distance between your eyes and your computer screen and bring that information to the optometrist, so that you can get your eyes tested for that specific working distance.

Computer vision syndrome may be exacerbated by an underlying dry eye disease, which can be diagnosed and treated at our eye clinic in Diamond Bar.

Sometimes people who have good visual acuity assume they don’t need any glasses. However, even very mild prescriptions can improve eyestrain and curb fatigue when working at a computer.

2. Good lighting is key

Excessively bright light, whether due to outdoor sunshine coming in through the window or harsh interior lighting, is a common cause of eyestrain. When using your computer, your ambient lighting should be about 50% dimmer than what is typically found in most offices.

You can reduce exterior light by closing drapes, blinds or shades and diminish interior illumination by using fewer or lower intensity bulbs. Computer users often find that turning off overhead fluorescent lights and replacing them with floor lamps is easier on their eyes.

Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D. Eye Clinic and Computer Vision Syndrome, Eye Care in Diamond Bar, California

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Diamond Bar eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

3. Minimize glare

Eyestrain can be aggravated by glare from light reflecting off surfaces including your computer screen. Position your computer so that windows are neither directly in front of nor behind the monitor, but rather to the side of it. Consider installing an anti-glare screen on your display. If you wear glasses, get anti-reflective (AR) coating on your lenses to reduce glare by limiting the amount of light that reflects off the front and back surfaces of your lenses (more on that below.)

4. Upgrade your display

If you have a CRT (cathode) screen on your monitor, consider replacing it with a flat-panel LED (light-emitting diode) screen that includes an anti-reflective surface. Old-school CRT screens can be a major cause of computer eye strain due to the flickering images.

For your new flat panel desktop display, choose one with a diagonal screen size of at least 19 inches, and the higher the resolution, the better.

Local Computer Vision Syndrome, Eye Care in Diamond Bar, California

Read what our patients have to say on Google Reviews

5. Adjust display settings for added comfort

Adjusting your computer display settings can help decrease eye strain and fatigue too.

Brightness: Adjust your device’s brightness to match the luminance around you. If the white background of this page looks like a light source, then it should be dimmed. However, if it appears dull and gray, it may not provide enough contrast, which can make it hard to read.

Text size: Adjust the text size for maximum eye comfort, particularly when reading, editing or writing long documents. Increase the size if you find yourself squinting, but bigger isn’t always better, since overly large text display may force your eyes to track back and forth too quickly for comfort.

Color temperature: This refers to the spectrum of visible light emitted by a color display. Blue light is short-wavelength visible light, whereas orange and red are longer wavelength hues. Exposure to blue light helps keep you alert but tends to cause eye fatigue after a while; yellow to red tints are more relaxing and may be better for long-term viewing, especially at night. Many devices allow the user to adjust the color temperature.

6. Get computer glasses

Nearly 70% of North Americans experience digital eye strain related to prolonged use of electronic devices. To combat these effects, Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D. recommends digital protection coatings, which act as a shield to cut the glare and filter the blue light emanating from digital screens and artificial light.

For the greatest eye comfort, ask Dr. Theresa Taylor for customized computer glasses, which feature mildly tinted lenses that filter out blue light. These can be made with or without prescription vision correction, for the benefit of those with 20/20 vision or contact lens wearers, though many people with contacts actually prefer to have alternative eyewear to use when their lenses become dry and uncomfortable from extended screen time.

Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D. can help you choose from a vast array of effective optical lenses and lens coatings to relieve the effects of digital eye strain.

7. Don’t forget to blink

When staring at a digital device people tend to blink up to 66% less often, and often the blinks performed during computer work are only partial which aren’t as effective at keeping the eyes moist and fresh feeling. Making a conscious effort to blink more while working or watching can prevent dryness and irritation.

8. Exercise your eyes

Another cause of computer eye strain is focusing fatigue. Look away from your computer every 20 minutes and gaze at an object located 20 feet away, for a minimum of 20 seconds. This “”20-20-20 rule”” is a classic exercise to relax the eyes’ focusing muscles and reduce computer vision syndrome.

The steps above don’t require a tremendous amount of time or money to be effective. Contact Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D. in Diamond Bar to make an appointment with Dr. Theresa Taylor and learn how the right eye drops, eye exercises, computer glasses, or AR coatings can improve eye comfort, reduce computer vision syndrome and potentially lead to increased productivity and job satisfaction.

Call Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D. on 909-402-2020 to schedule an eye exam with our Diamond Bar optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


Just in case you missed them, here are some of our previous blog posts :

EYE DROPS AND TREATMENT FOR SEASONAL ALLERGIES

Women and Diabetes – World Diabetes Day

Sjogren’s Awareness Month – Understanding The Invisible Disease 

UNHEALTHY BLUE-LIGHT WAVES EFFECTS EVERYONE

Diamond Bar eye exam – It’s time for your regular eye exam!

Before you respond that you don’t need an eye exam because your eyes and vision are good, read on!

Many common age-related eye diseases can have absolutely no symptoms during the early stages, including macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. That means you can walk around for a long time with a serious, sight-threatening eye disease without any clue that you have it. Unfortunately, though, the later these eye diseases are diagnosed, the harder they are to treat. The best way to prevent vision loss is, therefore, to be proactive about visiting an eye care professional for routine comprehensive eye exams to detect eye disease way before you notice any signs!

Make your vision a top priority and visit an eye clinic near you

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Diamond Bar eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Age-related eye problems are common

According to statistics released by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, approximately two of three adults in America report having problems with their vision or eyes. What kind of problems? About 64% of adults have at least one of the following:

  • Blurry vision
  • Flashes of light
  • Double vision
  • Red, watery eyes
  • The trouble with night vision
  • Difficulty reading up close

However, only 13% of these people attest that they visited an eye clinic for an eye exam! At Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D., we encourage you to be responsible with your eye care and book an appointment. It’s the best way to protect your quality vision for as long as possible.

Begin routine eye exams from age 40

Even if you have no family history or personal medical history of eye disease, it’s recommended to get a baseline eye exam at age 40. If you have a preexisting health condition that can affect eyes, such as high blood pressure or diabetes, your eye doctor may recommend more frequent eye exams. Also, once you are over age 65, yearly eye exams are typically advised.

We are committed to personalized eye care in our Diamond Bar, California, eye care clinic, and our eye doctor will provide guidelines for each individual about how often to visit.

Vision loss is not inevitable

Vision loss from age-related eye disease is often curable or preventable, especially when diagnosed early. But remember, your eye care provider cannot help treat a problem or improve your vision if the problem has never been diagnosed!

Call 909-402-2020, or Alternatively book an appointment online here
CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

Diamond Bar contact lenses, Are contact lenses better than glasses?

Dr. Taylor Bladh, O.D. Eye Clinic in Diamond Bar, California

Do contacts make your vision worse?

You have just visited our eye care clinic for an eye exam in Diamond Bar, California and you received a new vision prescription. Now it is time to purchase new eyewear – should you buy eyeglasses or contact lenses? As long as your eyes are healthy, the choice is yours.

Many differences exist between glasses and contact lenses, and people wonder whether one type of eyewear is more effective and more suitable for their lifestyle. To help you make an educated decision, Dr. Bladh, your optometrist for Diamond Bar and the Diamond Bar area, has put together this outline of what you need to know about glasses and contact lenses.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Diamond Bar eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Contact lenses supplier in Diamond Bar, California

Features Shared by Glasses & Contacts

First of all, let’s look at the similarities between contacts and eyeglasses:

    • Both can precisely treat nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism to give you sharp vision
  • You need to clean them properly to ensure crystal-clear vision; with glasses, this means spraying and wiping the lenses, and with contacts, there are varying degrees of care (depending upon which type you select)
  • Both glasses and contacts are affordable

All About Eyeglasses

Nowadays, glasses are made from plastic, making them much lighter than years ago. Also, plastic lenses can be coated with various treatments to protect your eyes, such as against dangerous UV light or to block blue light from digital devices. Polycarbonate or Trivex lenses are ideal for children and people who play sports because they do not shatter on impact. Another option for people with very strong prescriptions is high index lenses, which are a thinner and lighter form of vision correction.

There are two primary types of glasses: single vision and multifocal. Single vision eyeglasses correct problems with seeing close or seeing far, while multifocal glasses help with seeing both distance and near-vision issues.

Multifocals come in a few versions:

  • Bifocal lenses are bisected into two zones. The upper half helps with seeing distance and the lower half of the lens helps with reading and other close tasks.
  • Trifocals have three areas in the lenses. The top is for distance, the bottom is for up close, and the region between the two is for middle vision.
  • Progressive lenses are essentially the same as bifocals and trifocals, yet with no dividing line in the lens. The visual transition between the different lens powers is gradual and smooth.

What’s Good About Glasses, and What’s Not

Pros:

  • Eyeglasses are easy to use. You just put them on your face and out you go. There are no specialized cleaning solutions and care is minimal. If you have a particular style or fashion statement you want to make with your glasses, a range of frame designs is available from our optometrist for Diamond Bar. Also, if you work in a job that leaves your fingers dirty all the time, you don’t need to touch your eyes when putting on glasses. So the risk of eye infection is very low.

Cons:

  • The main disadvantage of eyeglasses relates to how they look and feel. Many people simply don’t like their appearance in glasses. Also, you also may find them uncomfortable on your nose or pressing above your ears. Another con of glasses is that the lenses can fog up, get splashed in rainy weather, and fall off (or slip down your sweaty nose) during sports. The plastic lenses can also scratch.

All About Contact Lenses

Contacts are thin discs made from either glass or plastic, depending upon whether you have soft or hard (GP) lenses. These discs rest directly on your eye to correct vision. Our Diamond Bar contact lenses collection includes a full inventory of single vision, bifocal, and multifocal versions. Soft contact lenses, which are much more popular, come in several types:

  • Daily wear lenses: worn during the day; removed and cleaned nightly
  • Daily disposables (dailies): worn once and then thrown away
  • Extended wear lenses: can be worn overnight; taken out at least once a week for disinfecting

What’s Good About Contacts, and What’s Not

Pros:

  • Contact lenses provide more natural vision than eyeglasses, as well as a more natural appearance that doesn’t block your face. They give a wider field of view and a clear peripheral vision. Because contacts move with your eye, no frame ever gets in your way or disturbs your line of sight. Also, contacts never fog up or get splashed with water droplets when it rains. When playing sports, contact lenses can be ultra-convenient.

Cons:

  • Contacts require higher maintenance than glasses. You must clean and store them properly or you risk getting serious eye infections. If you have high astigmatism, contacts may not be able to provide sharp vision all the time – because you’ll see blurry when they rotate. Toric contacts, which are specialized for astigmatism, have less of a tendency to move around, but they are more costly. You may also need a short adjustment period to adapt to wearing contacts, and more follow-up care from our optometrist for Diamond Bar.

That’s the basic rundown of contact lenses versus eyeglasses! Dr. Bladh provides comprehensive eye exams for Diamond Bar and the entire Diamond Bar area, and he will issue your accurate, up-to-date prescription for eyewear. Our optical staff will then be pleased to assist you with your decision whether to choose glasses, contact lenses or both!

Book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US

Authentic Ray-Ban Prescription Glasses and Sunglasses

ray ban sunglasses aviator dr bladh walnut ca

For years Ray-Ban has been the leader combining fashion and functionality. When you see that iconic Ray-Ban logo you know you’re getting a quality product. Of course with success also comes imitation, and in extreme cases downright counterfeits. Knowing how to spot a fake is key and for this very purpose, Ray-Ban has partnered with Dr. Bladh’s office to offer AUTHENTIC RAY-BAN LENSES near you for your Ray-Ban frames. Both sunglasses and clear glasses have the same logo with a laser engraved RB on every left lens right next to where the temples attach. Even the clear pair have a frost print in the corner with the Ray-Ban logo so you know it’s coming straight from the US factory, custom made for your eyes. The lab can do any color tint available in its line as well as any existing polarized lens.

rayban laser etching custom glasses

The most amazing part is that we were able to work a contract with Ray-Ban to offer this product at a lower price than its own website or any of its Lens Crafters stores. Mention this webpage and get 20% off any Authentic Ray-Ban Lens package. We are running this promotion for the summer so come in before the kids go back to school.

real rayban logo on lens diamond bar optometric

Ultraviolet Light and your Eyes

UV light walnut eye doctor

 

If you want strong, healthy eyes and clear vision for life, a major step you can take is to protect your eyes from UV radiation. Wearing proper eye protection from the sun reduces the risk of a number of eye diseases and other conditions that are caused or worsened by UV exposure.

Eye Diseases Linked to UV Exposure

UV exposure has been linked to a number of serious eye diseases including macular degeneration and cataracts.

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is a condition in which the macula of the eye breaks down, leading to a loss of central vision and is a leading cause of age-related vision loss. Macular degeneration develops over time so a lifetime of exposure to UV can contribute it’s likelihood.

Cataracts

Cataracts occur when the natural lens of the eye becomes clouded, resulting in blurred vision and eventually blindness. The lens is responsible for focusing the light that comes into the eye, allowing clear vision. Cataracts can be treated by a simple surgery to replace the clouded lens with an artificial lens. UV light contributes to certain types of cataracts, which account for about 10% of all cases.

Skin Cancer

Another serious disease that can affect the eyes is skin cancer which can appear on the eyelids or the area around the eyes. Skin cancer is known to be linked to extended exposure to UV and your eyes can be a difficult area to protect with sun block as you don’t want it to get too close to the eyes.

uv sunglasses phillips ranch ca

Other Eye Conditions Linked to UV Exposure

Photokeratitis or Corneal Sunburn

Photokeratitis or a corneal sunburn in layman’s terms can occur with intense exposure to the sun without proper eye protection. It is commonly experienced after a day skiing or snowboarding at a high altitude or at the beach. Corneal sunburns can be extremely painful and can sometimes cause a temporary loss of vision.

Pterygium

Pterygium, also known as “surfer’s eye” is a growth that forms on the conjunctiva which is a layer over the sclera or the white part of your eye. Sometimes they grow onto the cornea as well. Often pterygia are harmless but if they grow too large they may begin to impact your vision. In this case, surgery may be necessary. Pterygium are commonly found in individuals who spend a significant amount of time outside in the sun or wind.

How to Properly Protect Your Eyes From UV

The more time you spend outside, the greater the risk for your eyes, however you can easily minimize this risk with proper protection. Here are a few tips to ensure you are doing what you can to safeguard your eyes:

Proper Sunglasses

Fully protective sunglasses should block out 99-100% of UV-A and UV-B rays. You can achieve this through purchasing a pair of sunglasses, applying a UV blocking coating to your glasses or opting for photochromic lenses which are eyeglass lenses which turn dark when exposed to sunlight. Most contact lenses will also have UV protection but this is just for the area of the eye covered by the lens.

Since UV exposure can enter from the air, the ground or from the sides, wrap-around and large lensed frames can provide added protection.

Add a Wide Brimmed Hat

A wide brimmed hat or visor will stop about half of the UV rays from even reaching your eyes as well as reduce the exposure coming in from the top or sides of your sunglass frames.

test eyes for cataracts diamond bar

Know Your Environmental Risk Factors

UV exposure is largely dependent upon your location and your surroundings. If you are located at a high altitude you will likely be exposed to more UV than at lower altitudes. UV also reflects off of snow, sand, water and even asphalt so be aware that you are getting increased exposure under these conditions.

Know Your Additional Risk Factors

There are a number of other factors that can increase your exposure or risk of eye damage from UV. For example, certain medications increase the sensitivity of your eyes and skin to sunlight (speak to Dr. Bladh about any medications you are on). Previous eye surgery or eye diseases can also increase your risk factors for UV eye damage. Additionally if you work in certain fields such as wielding or medical scans or radiation or use tanning beds, you can be exposed to additional UV radiation. If there is nothing you can do to change your exposure, make sure you are properly protecting your eyes with goggles or glasses and a hat.

Regular Eye Exams

Make sure you call us at 909.861.3737 to schedule a comprehensive eye exam with Dr. Bladh on a regular basis to ensure your eyes are healthy. If you are over 50 or have increased risk factors for eye disease, you should schedule exams at least on a yearly basis.

Should I Be Concerned When My Eyelid Twitches?

We all experience the occasional eyelid twitch, which is when the muscle of the eyelid spasms involuntarily. Usually, it comes and goes without intervention and while sure, it can be irritating, is a twitching eyelid ever something to be concerned about?

An eyelid twitch, also known as a myokymia, can affect the upper or lower lid and usually lasts for at least a few seconds and then may continue off and on for a few minutes. Usually unpredictable, twitching episodes can last several days and sometimes they may go away and then return weeks or months later.

Causes of Eyelid Twitching

Although they may be bothersome, most eyelid twitches are nothing to cause concern and usually resolve on their own. However, in some rare cases, they may be a sign of a more serious problem, especially if they are accompanied by other symptoms – we will discuss this further below.

Some known causes of eyelid twitches include:

 

  • Fatigue or lack of sleep
  • Stress
  • Eye irritation or dry eyes
  • Medications
  • Alcohol or caffeine
  • Physical exertion
  • Allergies
  • Eye strain (such as with extended digital device use)
  • Poor nutrition

 

Preventing and Treating Eyelid Twitching

Usually eyelid twitching will resolve itself within a couple of days or weeks but if it persists try to determine the cause in order to speed up the process. Consider going to bed a little earlier, cutting out caffeine or alcohol or finding ways to reduce or manage your stress. You can also try lubricating eye drops to add moisture to your eyes. If you take notice of when the spasms are happening and what else is going on in your life at that time (time of day, food intake, stress level, exhaustion) you can make some changes that will stop or prevent eye twitching from occuring.

If you notice eye twitching in addition to vision disturbances or eye strain, contact Dr. Bladh’s office for a vision assessment as it could be a sign of a refractive change.

When is Eyelid Twitching a Concern?

If the eyelid spasms don’t pass and become chronic it may be a sign that you have a condition called benign essential blepharospasm. This condition is when the eye muscles blink uncontrollably and it usually affects both eyes. While the cause of blepharospasm is not known, it is more common in middle age women and there are a number of conditions that can exacerbate symptoms including:

  • Eye inflammation (blepharitis) or infection (pink eye)
  • Dry eyes
  • Fatigue
  • Stress
  • Alcohol, caffeine or tobacco
  • Irritants or allergens in the environment

Blepharospasm is usually a progressive condition that can eventually lead to spasms in other muscles in the face, blurred vision and light sensitivity. The condition is sometimes treated with medication or Botox (botulinum toxin) to temporarily reduce the spasms and in severe cases, surgery may be performed to remove some of the muscles that are affected.

On very rare occasions eye twitching can be a symptom of a more serious disorder affecting the brain or nervous system, however, usually it will be accompanied by other symptoms. Examples of such conditions include: glaucoma, hemifacial spasms, Parkinson’s disease, Bell’s palsy, multiple sclerosis, dystonia, and Tourette’s. A corneal scratch or abrasion can also be a cause of the eyelid muscle spasm.

If you experience any of the following symptoms along with your eye twitching, see your primary care physician as soon as possible:

  • Twitching that continues for more than a few weeks
  • Twitching that spreads to other areas of the face
  • A drooping upper eyelid
  • Red, irritated or swollen eyes
  • Discharge coming from the eye
  • Spasms that cause the eyelid to close completely or difficulty opening the eyelid.

In most cases, eye twitching is not something to worry about, but when you do experience a spasm it is worthwhile to take note of the circumstances so you know when your body is trying to tell you that something is out of balance.

Nike

 

nike sunglasses diamond bar vsp doctor

When looking into the giant swoosh, one only needs to research the original founder Phil Knight. His innovation and desire for the best has made the company what it is today. Nike originally started as a track shoe company, making the first sole designs out of an old waffle iron. It’s actually on display at Nike headquarters in Oregon. Besides the brilliant marketing the company has done, it has also invested in the right type of athletes and technology. With the majority of profit coming from shoes, Nike entered the eyewear market several decades ago, when there was a push for healthier lifestyles. This brought on the demand for running sunglasses that were light and wouldn’t fog from sweat. The company has invested in state of the art technology and sponsored multiple sports themed research papers using the information gained in their actual product. This advancement has brought some of the lightest and most advanced sunglasses we’ve ever had in the office.

  • Backed by science and research.
  • Phil Knight, the founder is still involved in the day to day operations of the company.
  • Athlete tested and approved.
  • Advancements in lens design specific for your sport.

Visit Nike

Guess


Established in 1981 by the Marciano brothers, Guess Jeans started with a small order for Bloomingdale’s and quickly rose to a company that is now the global brand sold in over 80 countries! They were born in France but left to pursue the American Dream and fell in love with the young, California lifestyle. Once they experienced it, they took this dream and tried to express it in denim. The company has offered Guess sunglasses and glasses for over 3 decades now and a major player, Marcolin, has established a long-term licensing agreement to combine with its long list of fashion brands.

  • Brand’s values related to the daring and self-confident.
  • On-trend designs that fully embrace the brand DNA.
  • Captivating models and daring combinations interpreted with modern silhouettes.
  • Jennifer Lopez has signed on as the brand ambassador for the 2018 campaign.

Visit Guess

 

Trouble Seeing the Fine Print? Here are Your Options…

 

reading glasses diamond bar

Every good pair of eyes eventually gets old, and with age comes a condition called presbyopia. Presbyopia, which usually begins to set in some time around 40, occurs when the lens of the eye begins to stiffen, making near vision (such as reading books, menus, and computer screens) blurry. You may have this age-related farsightedness if you notice yourself holding the newspaper further and further away in order to make out the words, and you may begin to experience headaches or eyestrain as well.

The good news is, presbyopia is very common. It happens to most of us eventually and these days there are a number of good options to correct it. First of all, let’s take a look at what causes the condition.

What Causes Presbyopia?

As the eye ages, the natural lens begins to lose its elasticity as the focusing muscles (the ciliary muscles) surrounding the lens have difficulty changing the shape of the lens. The lens is responsible for focusing light that comes into the eye onto the retina for clear vision. The hardened or less flexible lens causes the light which used to focus on the retina to shift its focal point behind the retina when looking at close objects. This causes blurred vision.

Presbyopia is a progressive condition that gets worse with time. It is a refractive error just like myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism.

Signs of presbyopia include:

  • Blurred near vision
  • Difficulty focusing on small print or close objects
  • Eyestrain, headaches or fatigue, especially when reading or doing close work
  • Holding reading material at a distance to see properly
  • Needing brighter light to see close objects

Presbyopia can be diagnosed through an eye exam.

Treatments for Presbyopia

There are a number of options for presbyopia treatment which include glasses, contact lenses or surgery.

cute reading glasses pomona ca

Glasses

The most common form of correction is eyeglasses. Reading glasses adjust the focal point of the target to reduce the focusing demand on the eyes. A side effect of the convex lenses is that they also magnify the target. For some, reading glasses are sufficient to improve close vision. Others, especially those with another refractive error, require more complex lenses.

Bifocal or multifocal lenses, including progressive addition lenses (PALs), offer a solution for those with nearsightedness or farsightedness. These lenses have two or more prescriptions within the same lens, usually in different areas, to allow correction for distance vision and near vision within the same lens. While bifocals and standard multifocals typically divide the lenses into two hemispheres (or more), requiring the patient to look in the proper hemisphere depending on where they are focusing, with an unattractive contour calling attention to the presbyopia portion of the lens, progressive lenses provide a progressive transition of lens power creating a smooth, gradual change. Some people prefer progressive lenses for aesthetic reasons as they don’t have a visible line dividing the hemispheres.

Contact Lenses

Like glasses, contact lenses are also available in bifocal and multifocal lenses. Alternatively, some eye doctors will prescribe monovision contact lens wear, which divides the vision between your eyes. Typically it fits your dominant eye with a single vision lens for distance vision and your weaker eye with a single vision lens for near vision. Sometimes your eye doctor will prescribe modified monovision which uses a multifocal lens in the weaker eye to cover intermediate and near vision. Newer contact lens technology is making both lenses multifocal, and therefore doctors are becoming less dependent on monovision. Sometimes monovision takes a while to adjust to.

Based on your prescription, your eye doctor will help you decide which option is best for you and assist you through the adjustment period to determine whether this is a feasible option. Since there are so many baby boomers with presbyopia nowadays, the contact lens choices have expanded a lot within recent years.

Surgery

There are a few surgical treatments available for presbyopia. These include monovision LASIK surgery (which is a refractive surgery that works similar to monovision glasses or contact lenses), corneal inlays or onlays (implants placed on the cornea), refractive lens exchange (similar to cataract surgery, this replaces the old, rigid lens with a manufactured intraocular lens), and conductive keratoplasty (which uses radio waves to reshape the cornea in a noninvasive procedure).

sjogrens syndrom doctor diamond bar

Medication – On the Horizon

There are currently clinical trials with promising early results that are testing eye drops that restore the flexibility of the human lens. It could be possible that in the near future eye drop prescriptions could be used to reduce the amount of time that people have to use reading glasses or contact lenses.

These procedures vary in cost, recovery and outcome. If you are interested in surgery, schedule a consultation with Dr. Bladh to learn all of the details of the different options.

As people are living longer, presbyopia is affecting a greater percentage of the population and more research is being done into treatments for the condition. So if your arm is getting tired from holding books so far away, Call our office at 909.861.3737 to discuss the best option for you.